We hope everyone’s week is going great. If you haven’t seen it in your inbox, don’t miss our first newsletter of 2017. Here are a few upcoming improvements currently being work on:

  • Make Private Calendar Events – A small but big change! The student field will become optional and when left blank, blocks out time on your calendar for personal events. That way, you can prevent a student from requesting a lesson during a time you are busy like a dentist appointment in the middle of the day or if you’re meeting with a prospective student, that isn’t added to your Student List yet.
  • Embed the Registration Form on Your Other Websites – Soon, you’ll be able to add a new student registration form on any website you own. Currently, you can place a login form on any site you own for existing students and parents. Some members add the login form to their personal teaching site or if they choose to use another site for their studio instead of a Music Teacher’s Helper website theme. The registration form will work exactly the same as the one on the studio website associated with your account.  
  • Start/End Dates for Rate Packages – In last week’s announcement, we described how to customize rate packages in Beta mode. We’re adding the ability to create start and end calendar dates for a specific package. This will be helpful for special circumstances and provide more flexibility in how you bill your students.

That’s it for this week. Happy teaching!

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Posted in New Features and Fixes

We hope that you’ve had a chance to check out Beta mode and experience the new features. Let us know what you think so far by clicking the Feedback tab on the right hand side when logged into Beta. If you haven’t had a chance to switch over but want to see all that’s included, please reference this support article, which is updated when new features are added.

Also, it’s now easier to keep up with these weekly announcements straight from your main dashboard. The Latest Blog Articles section at the bottom of your dashboard now shows these weekly updates and other announcements in one tab, and all other blog articles in another. The selected header is shown in blue. Clicking on the header switches over to the other section.

 

Get to Know the Beta Features: More Customizable Rate Packages

This improvement was announced already, but we want to make sure you know about it and where to find the tutorial.

With the new rate packages, you have greater flexibility and customization in how you charge your students and update your rates for multiple students at once. Rather than only being able to charge per lesson or a flat fee, under the new rates feature you will be able to set up rate packages to:

  • Bill hourly, weekly, monthly, or by semester
  • Charge for a series of lessons (a set amount for a certain number of lessons that you specify)
  • Bill up front in a lump sum or pro-rate the amount over the rate package
  • Choose to receive a reminder to reschedule a student when they are nearing the end of the lessons they paid for

All of this will be managed from one easy place in your Settings so you can create, edit and remove rate packages as needed and then assign each student a particular rate package that meets both their needs and schedule as well as yours.

For full instructions and how to use for new versus existing students, please reference this support article.

That’s it for this week. We’ll have more information on the latest beta changes for you next week. Happy teaching!

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Posted in New Features and Fixes

Andrew

Member Spotlight – George

January 6th, 2017 by

Welcome back to our member spotlight series. Today we have George. He teaches guitar and drums in East Bridgewater, Massachusetts.

How long you’ve been teaching?
Since 1995.

How would you describe your studio space to someone that’s never visited?
I travel to the students’ home.

Was there a specific moment when you realized you loved teaching music?
I think when I realized how much joy it can bring to people both young an old made me realize I was doing something worthwhile, both for them and for myself.

How did you feel in the moment you made the decision to be an independent music teacher? Do you recall being nervous/excited/scared?
I was excited because it is a risk but the reward of being able to do something you enjoy is worth the risk.

What were the steps you took to get your first lessons to having a full student roster?
It is always a little slow going at first but it will happen over time if you stick to it. I mainly started out with flyers and internet ads and then as you go referrals happen and your business spreads through word of mouth.

What is one piece of advice you could offer to someone looking to start teaching music lessons?
Don’t stop you have to always put the work in even when at times it can seem discouraging.

How do you currently find new students?
I use a combination of things to attract new students. You really cannot rely solely on one thing. Try different things find what works best and stick with it.

How do you feel when you think back to all students you’ve interacted with over the years and impacted positively?
It is a good feeling to feel like you possibly may have made a difference in their lives in a positive way.

What is your favorite part of a lesson?
Usually working on songs especially songs that a student enjoys playing.

Is there a favorite piece or style of music you find yourself teaching your students today? And how has that changed from when you started teaching?
I like teaching modern songs and country. When I first started it was more geared towards rock but you need to adapt to the times.

How long have you been using Music Teacher’s Helper?
About 10 years.

What is your favorite thing about Music Teacher’s Helper?
It helps me keep track of my students lessons which is a crucial thing if you are self employed.

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Posted in Professional Development, Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management, Teaching Tips

Hello, friends! As a teacher of over 10 years and a musician for 20 years, I feel like I’ve seen nearly all aspects of the business. Teaching, performing, record sales, composing, recording, music videos, YouTube blogs, you name it. As musicians, we can have many different goals for the present and the future. Some of us just want to strum a guitar on the front porch, some of us want to do this for a living and have it be financially successful. It’s the latter group that I want to address. To those of you that have the dedication, patience, talent, and drive to look at music as a possible career and not just a hobby or pastime.

Over the years I’ve discovered a very disturbing truth about being a musician, and it’s something that each of us must face and know how to deal with to be successful. That truth is that musicians are one of the most poorly treated occupations in the country. Don’t believe me? Let me ask you this:

As a musician, be it a teacher or performer, how many times have you been asked to play a show “for exposure” (a.k.a. for nothing)?

How many times have you been asked to play a show for a bar tab or a payment so small it barely covers the cost of gas to the venue?

How many times have you been in a “pay to play” situation, the worst of all? As a teacher how many times have you been asked for a free “trial lesson”?

My guess is you can answer yes to at least one of these questions and much more just like it, and it may have happened to you many times. I know I can answer yes to all the above. Now let me ask you this: Have you ever asked a plumber if they will fix your clogged sink for free and then if they do a good job you’ll pay them next time? Have you ever walked into a restaurant and asked for a free meal and then said if it’s good you’ll tell your friends and help them get exposure? Have you ever gone into a business that was struggling and offered to pay half price since you know they are desperate?

I feel confident you have never done any of these things, as a matter of fact, if you did the response would be anywhere from a smack in the face to a visit from the police! So why is it that musicians get this honor? Why are musicians looked down on in such low regard that the above treatment is common practice where the same treatment to any other profession would be considered incredibly rude? Well, I have a theory…

The stereotypical musician to a lot of people out there is someone barely getting by, desperate for work, etc. Or sometimes people view musicians as hobbyists only that want to have fun and have no real aspirations. These views are so common that I think people who are otherwise very friendly and caring will do business with musicians in a very denigrating way, and they may not even realize they are doing it! The other reason this happens is that musicians themselves can also fall into this mode of thinking and convince themselves that they aren’t worth very much, or that they should play free shows or charge next to nothing for lessons. It’s a vicious cycle that we need to break!

Allow me to share with you a couple short stories that illustrate both points (these are true stories):

A band is contacted to play a fund-raising show/charity auction for a few hundred people at a nice hotel ballroom. After a discussion about the show and the expectations the band gives a quote to the organizer at a discounted rate since it is a charity show. After a pause of silence, the organizer says that they were hoping the band would volunteer their time. The band’s representative then asked:

Are you paying for use of the ballroom? The answer: “yes”

Are you paying the wait staff that are serving the food? “yes”

Are you paying for the food and the cooks to prepare it? “yes”

Are you paying the auctioneer to run the auction? “yes”

The band then responded: “Ok now that we have established that you are paying for literally everyone and everything involved with this show, now let’s talk about what you are paying the band”.

The organizer was shocked, not because of the attitude of the band, but because they clearly hadn’t thought of it this way, they agreed to pay the band their original quote by the end of the call.

Another story about how this mentality can affect musicians as well:

A good friend of mine teaches piano, she is talented and a good teacher, and has played piano since she was a child. She told me one time that she was having a lot of trouble getting people to pay on time, people doing “no call no shows”, not taking their lessons seriously, showing up late or at the wrong time entirely, etc. I was very confused because I rarely run into these problems, and we live within a few miles of each other so I knew it wasn’t because of location. I thought: could it be that guitar students take things more seriously than piano students? That doesn’t make any sense, what could be the difference? Well, I figured it out: She was charging almost nothing for her lessons, about 1/3rd of what I charge. She was doing this because she felt like she couldn’t charge more, that somehow she isn’t worth it. She fell into this thinking that musicians are somehow not worth as much as other professions. By charging so little she attracted people that weren’t serious about their lessons, the casual students that are looking for a deal, not a great teacher. Since I charge what I know I’m worth, I get serious students that treat me with respect and I do the same in return. I love my students! They are my friends and customers, and I do everything I can to make them happy and satisfied with their lessons. However, I also know what my time is worth after 20 years of experience and education, and I feel it’s very important for a variety of reasons to charge that amount.

So what should you do? What is it that I’m suggesting? I’m suggesting that you, as a professional musician, start demanding what you are worth and stand by that decision. Now you may be thinking: if I charge a reasonable rate for teaching I’ll never get students because there are so many teachers out there charging so much less. Or you may be thinking: If my band starts asking to be paid for shows or a higher rate we’ll lose shows to other bands that are willing to play for free!

Sure, those things are possible, but let me ask you this: Do you think the people at Apple are afraid of losing business because they charge more for phones than other companies? Believe me, they aren’t afraid of that at all. They know they have a good product on their hands and they charge what they believe it’s worth, and they can barely keep their phones in stock. Millions of us are willing to pay more for it when we could have gotten a cheaper phone instead. The same goes for teachers, bands, and everyone else! So maybe you will lose a few students with increased prices, odds are high that you will be replacing them with students that are much more serious and dedicated. So maybe your band won’t be able to play the local dive bar anymore because they won’t pay your rate? The nicer resorts, restaurants, private parties, etc. will! So I say demand what you are worth and stop getting taken advantage of!

Now this doesn’t mean you just raise your rates and sit back and expect huge success! Make yourself the best! I don’t mean the most talented musician in town because honestly, that isn’t really necessary. What is necessary however is being the most professional! Have a nice, quiet, spacious, clean, welcoming lesson room. Offer your students an in-depth learning experience that they can’t get anywhere else. Be knowledgeable and able to answer any question, know your stuff! Be that band that is always on time, always dependable, always practiced up, and always a great show. Make yourself different than everyone else, go above and beyond and offer things that other bands or teachers don’t offer. Treat your customers with the utmost respect, treat them like family. Make your band or your business the best it can possibly be and people will come!

This also doesn’t mean you should NEVER take on a free show or a student at a discounted rate. I’ll play a free performance for a cause I truly believe in, but it would be of my own choosing not because I was made to feel like I must. I would be happy to give a discounted lesson rate to a young student without much money if I felt like they had a real passion for music, but again, this is my own choosing, not pressure from someone that doesn’t think I’m worth what I charge. Being a musician is an incredible gift that very few people have. If you are a good teacher on top of that, or a hard-working reliable band, then you are even rarer and valuable.

I hope this inspires you to rethink the structure of your business, band, teaching studio, etc. I can’t guarantee success of course, but it’s hard to imagine a negative outcome from all of us as musicians believing in ourselves and knowing that our profession deserves just as much respect as any other!

 

Marc Miller is the owner of Sound Theory Studio in Tucson, AZ with 20 years of experience composing and performing, and over 10 years experience teaching guitar. Educated at Berklee College of Music (Master Guitar Certification) with have several albums to his credit in many different genres.

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Posted in Performing, Professional Development

Welcome to 2017! We hope this year is even better than the last for you and your studio. A few announcements to start off the new year. First, you will now see an option to experience Beta mode once logged into your account.

Why Use Beta Mode?

Beta mode offers over dozens of improvements and new features in the Student, Calendar, Lesson, and Settings areas of the site. Here’s a list with links to instructions for the major new features in Beta mode. You can switch out of Beta mode at any time if you’d prefer not to use it at this time, but we hope to transition everyone over to the new features before too long.

Beta mode allows you to experience new features and gives our programming team an opportunity to fix any minor issues before making it permanent. While in Beta Mode, you’ll see a Feedback button on the right-hand side. Your feedback lets us know how it’s working and gives you an opportunity to share ideas for how we can continue to improve Music Teacher’s Helper.

Have a great first week of the new year and happy teaching!

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Posted in New Features and Fixes

composing holiday activity with music students

I didn’t warn my students they’d be composing. I was pretty sure they’d feel intimidated, so I simply asked them for favorite holiday phrases. When they asked why, I said, “You’ll see.” And once they heard the glimmer of a secret, they were hooked.

Here’s what we did.

STEP 1

“Think of one or two short holiday phrases .” (Three or four phrases for older students.)

“What’s a holiday phrase?”

“A word or group of words you hear around Christmastime. It could even be words to a song.”

Some might want an example, such as “Merry Christmas!” Or show them this.  I heard “Ho, ho, ho!” “Open up the presents.” “Happy Birthday, Jesus!” In addition, one came up with “Hark! How the jingle bells rock!” Another said, “Elf on the shelf.”

This exercise provided both rhythm and lyrics for the composing activity. But it only took about five minutes.

STEP 2

We listed the phrases and spoke them in rhythm one after the other. We switched the order until they liked the flow. Then I had them tap and clap the rhythms. If they gave too long a phrase, I said “We need it shorter.” Or if the first phrase was in three but the next in four, “Try another.”

This took five minutes or under.

STEP 3

The melody of their composing came next.

Read more…

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Posted in Composing & Arranging, Promoting Your Studio

We hope your holiday break is off to a great start! Starting this Wednesday, the Beta option will be available to all members! You’ll see a green notification near the top of your dashboard when logged in. For instructions on how to turn Beta mode on and off, and for a full list of new features in Beta with tutorials, please reference this support article. We’ll continue adding to that list and making announcements as Beta features are added. 

Additionally, an improved billing feature is on the way that will be easier to use and offers more control over what shows on invoices. There will be more details as we get closer to launch, but we’re excited about how the changes will improve you and your students’ experience!

Have Feedback?

While in Beta Mode, you’ll see a Feedback button on the right-hand side. Please let us know how it’s working for you and share your ideas for how we can improve Music Teacher’s Helper. We continue to receive excellent feedback that helps us further improve the new features.

Have a great week and happy teaching!

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Posted in New Features and Fixes

music teaching positive

We asked a few Music Teacher’s Helper members about something positive that happened in their studio this past year. Here are some answers below. Tell us yours in the comment section! 

“I started teaching students as young as five years old this year, and my studio grew. :)” – Brooke

“This year I am thankful that when one branch of my studio closed, a majority of my students from there traveled out of their way to continue to study with me at my home branch. I am grateful for their dedication and trust in my teaching. :)” – Lisa

“In 2016 I became much more professional. One of the things that helped the Alameda Cello Studio was Music Teacher’s Helper. It helped me to have an online presence that looks great, and also to get my student info organized and my calendar online.” – Marcie

“Finished the year with a great student piano recital! I appreciate the immediate, knowledge, and courteous help available through your live chat support.  Thanks!” – Angela

“I’ve had good recitals this year — and gained some wonderful new students, including a 25 year old autistic young man who I love working with.” – Karen

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Posted in Professional Development, Studio Management

pianostar

As a piano teacher, I have to say that I am often underwhelmed by music books for beginners. To be fair to the composers of such books, it is an extremely difficult challenge to write engaging music with such a limited palette of notes but having said that, young students still need to be inspired to build skill and move their music-making to the next level. So I was curious to take a look at a new series for young pianists from the ABRSM (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music) entitled “Piano Star.”

There are three books in the series:

  • Book 1 builds from a very basic skill level up to Prep Test (Pre-Grade 1)
  • Book 2 is at Prep Test level
  • Book 3 continues the journey building to Grade 1 standard

I have to say that I am very Read more…

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Posted in Product Reviews, Professional Development, Teaching Tips

Everyone here at Music Teacher’s Helper would like to wish our members and their students a wonderful upcoming holiday and new year. Thank you for using Music Teacher’s Helper this past year to manage your studio – our team enjoys serving you and continually striving to deliver software that makes your lives’ better. Let’s get into this week’s announcements:

New Attendance Tab in Beta Mode

One of the most requested features we’ve had is the ability to track individual attendance for group lessons. This week, we’ll be releasing this feature to our beta members as part of the new Attendance page. Attendance and lesson notes are now entered on the Calendar under a new tab called “Attendance”, found next to the month/weekly/agenda and location views.  

Other Recent Beta Changes:

  • You now have the ability to switch a student between child and adult status. This is convenient in case you’ve entered them as a mistake or as child students grow up and begin paying for their own lessons.
  • In addition to creating events in the lesson menu, you can also create events in the Calendar of various durations by clicking and dragging from start to end time on week or day view. This also works for multi-day events on month view.

We’re also working on lots of other updates behind the scenes that and will continue to release them to Beta in the coming weeks.  

Have Feedback?

While in Beta Mode, you’ll see a Feedback button on the right-hand side. Please let us know how it’s working for you and share your ideas for how we can improve Music Teacher’s Helper. We continue to receive excellent feedback that helps us further improve the new features.

Have a great week and happy teaching!

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Posted in New Features and Fixes