It’s been such a pleasure collaborating with Andrea West. She’s a piano teacher and graphic designer. Andrea recently created some stunning graphics for recital programs and a video on how to create your program and I want to share them with you.

You can check out all her designs here.

Once you find a design you like, Andrea steps you through the process of how to use your favorite graphic to create your recital program in Word in the video below. Even if you don’t use Word, you’ll find her tips helpful when using Pages or Google Docs!

Full disclosure: The designs are found at the Piano Teacher Planning Center at my blog 88pianokeys.me. Usually, I wouldn’t write about “products”  featured in my own store but, I believe that Andrea provides such value in her video and her graphics that I felt compelled to share them here at MusicTeachersHelper.com.

Here’s what teachers have been saying about the video and the graphics:

“I just finished creating my spring recital program following Andrea’s step-by-step video instructions. She made it so easy! I love the template she created as it really makes my program cover pop! Thank you, thank you, thank you! Love it!”

-Paula W

“That tutorial was much better than some of the classes that I have taken in the past that I had to pay for!”

-Leisa J

Don’t worry about taking notes as Andrea also provided written instructions with plenty of graphics for visual learners like me. Click here to access the download.

There’s more…here’s a link to the free recital template Andrea talks about in the video.

One more thing, save on ink and spare yourself from printer frustrations by joining MTNA and taking advantage of their member benefits card. Show up with your “magic card” and you’ll get close to 60% your printing costs! Learn more here.

Click here if you can’t see the video.

Additional ways to amplify your graphic

The word “amplify” means to increase or enlarge. Why not get the most out of your graphic and put it to work beyond the recital cover? Here are tips on how to take advantage of cool graphics and increase traffic to your studio.

T-shirts

Amplification is exactly what good friend, fellow piano teacher and my online piano student, Debbie Moore did.  screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-11-17-15-amDebbie brought in her Jazzy Piano graphic to a local t-shirt store and asked them to design a t-shirt logo with the graphic.

Debbie limited the colors of the design to black and white to save money and had the design printed on colorful t-shirts. She gave a t-shirt to each of her students after the recital.

Why is this SUCH a stellar idea? The souvenir t-shirts cost $7 each. This may seem extravagant for a tight budget but, Debbie gave her students a snazzy t-shirt and also gave her studio some great exposure. As she lives very close to two schools and was driving by the playground, she saw students proudly wearing their recital t-shirts. BRILLIANT marketing!

Book Bags

Not into t-shirts? What about using the graphic to create book bags for your students?

I uploaded Jazzy Piano at Vista Print and kicked out this prototype cinch sack in minutes. I don’t know about yours, but my students beat up their book bags! I think I may be ordering some very soon.

95Wristbands or Trophies

One year I created customized slap bands and ordered them from AmazingWristbands.com. I checked and you can upload your own artwork at this site.

If you order trophies for students, you can upload your own image into “insert trophies.” Check out the options at Crown Awards.

Coffee Mugs

Like coffee? Look at this fancy coffee mug!

Marketing materials

Create postcard recital invitations for students to hand to friends and neighbors or a poster to hang at your students’ school.

spring-recital-2

Create Evite invitations. Use Evite as one more way of inviting/reminding parents about the recital date and time. It’s free and easy to use, and you can customize it with the same artwork as your recital cover to keep the theme consistent. This option will definitely save on printing costs!

Bonus: with Evite you can limit the number of guests, which you may need to do if you hold your recital in a small venue. Also, if you have more than one recital, Evite lets recipients add the date and time to their calendar, which will help them remember the correct performance time.

Create a Facebook cover. If you communicate regularly through your studio Facebook page, create a cover for your page with the same graphic as your program. This image was created at Canva.com.

spring-recitals-3

Your options to amplify the use of Andrea’s graphics are limited only by your imagination.

Please let us know how you put your graphic to work for your studio. Andrea and I would be eager to hear your ideas!

-Leila

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Posted in Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management, Teaching Tips

Folk songs used to top the lists of school music classes. Now it’s rare to find a student who has even heard many of our country’s folk songs. Why not celebrate them in a recital?

This is my second article in a series of ideas from my sister Vicky Dresser, maker of magical music recitals.  And as I’ve shared hers, I’ve gotten a few of my own. You’ll probably think up even more as you read. I invite you to share them with MTH readers in the comments below.

Organize Songs by Type or Genre:

  • Old colonial Times
  • River songs and Sea Chanteys
  • Spirituals
  • Wartime songs
  • Novelty songs
  • Camp songs
  • Old time religion
  • Mountain music
  • The old west
  • Patriotic songs
  • Good old folk tunes (plain and fancy)
  • Hi-brow
  • Modern folk
  • Mining songs from the gold rush

This type of recital practically begs for variety. Read more…

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Posted in Music History & Facts, Performing, Promoting Your Studio

A recital can set a fire in the hearts of students and audience. There aren’t many opportunities to showcase students of every level. So… make it more than a recital.

My sister makes magical music recitals. She’s given me permission to share some of her ideas.

Here are a few features of each.

  • Costumes
  • Props
  • Sets–here are some photo ideas
  • Ensembles
  • Extra instruments and vocals
  • Audience involvement
  • Variety
  • Humor whenever possible

If it seems intimidating, start small. Even simply naming a theme can create anticipation. It’s a great way to promote your studio.

In each of my next few MTH posts, I’ll detail a different recital of my sister’s, including a few songs. This first idea she calls “Holidays and Seasons.”

Each month is its own segment, with appropriate songs featured. There may not be a holiday that month, but people are born all the time. So every month includes “Happy Birthday,” done in twelve different genres. Anyone in the audience whose birthday falls in that month is invited to stand. Genres might include classical, march, swing, bluegrass, blues, waltz, video game, mariachi, 50s, Celtic, tango, calypso, polka, guitar ballad…

Here are a few songs for each month to get you started.

January. Jingle Bells/It’s a Marshmallow World/Let it Snow/Auld Lang Syne

February. I Heart You/When I Fall in Love/Won’t You Be My Valentine

March. St. Patrick’s Jiggle/Somewhere Over the Rainbow/Dance of the Irish

April. Billy Bunny/Easter Bonnet/April Showers/April Love

May. A Child’s Song of Love/M-O-T-H-E-R/flower songs/vet-honoring songs…

June. You’re a Grand Old Flag/wedding songs…

July. Patriotic songs/In the Good Old Summertime

August. By the Sea, By the Sea/Summertime/School Days

September. The Falling Leaves/autumn songs/Whistle While You Work

October. Funeral March of a Marionette/Halloween songs/Spunky Spooks

November. Thanksgiving songs/Over the River and Through the Woods/autumn and harvest songs…

December. Carol of the Bells/Believe (from Polar Express)/Where Are You, Christmas? (from The Grinch Who Stole Christmas)/Christmas songs/ Hanukkah songs…

Students can dress for the month they represent. You might create props or cardboard sets. For example, August could have a beach umbrella, beach towel, pail and plastic shovel, with a painted backdrop of ocean and sand. Students are responsible to set up for each other. To keep it running tight time-wise, one student could introduce the next, operating as emcee, while a couple remove props from the previous student, and others follow with the next props.

Hold a tech rehearsal to get the details/timing worked out.

My sister has colorful posters carried out for each month and placed on an easel.

She uses this recital format every other year, alternating with a strictly Christmas theme. There is so much music to choose from!

Do you have other ideas for a “Holiday and Seasons” recital? MTH readers would love to hear them!

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Posted in Performing, Promoting Your Studio

Andrew

Member Spotlight – George

January 6th, 2017 by

Welcome back to our member spotlight series. Today we have George. He teaches guitar and drums in East Bridgewater, Massachusetts.

How long you’ve been teaching?
Since 1995.

How would you describe your studio space to someone that’s never visited?
I travel to the students’ home.

Was there a specific moment when you realized you loved teaching music?
I think when I realized how much joy it can bring to people both young an old made me realize I was doing something worthwhile, both for them and for myself.

How did you feel in the moment you made the decision to be an independent music teacher? Do you recall being nervous/excited/scared?
I was excited because it is a risk but the reward of being able to do something you enjoy is worth the risk.

What were the steps you took to get your first lessons to having a full student roster?
It is always a little slow going at first but it will happen over time if you stick to it. I mainly started out with flyers and internet ads and then as you go referrals happen and your business spreads through word of mouth.

What is one piece of advice you could offer to someone looking to start teaching music lessons?
Don’t stop you have to always put the work in even when at times it can seem discouraging.

How do you currently find new students?
I use a combination of things to attract new students. You really cannot rely solely on one thing. Try different things find what works best and stick with it.

How do you feel when you think back to all students you’ve interacted with over the years and impacted positively?
It is a good feeling to feel like you possibly may have made a difference in their lives in a positive way.

What is your favorite part of a lesson?
Usually working on songs especially songs that a student enjoys playing.

Is there a favorite piece or style of music you find yourself teaching your students today? And how has that changed from when you started teaching?
I like teaching modern songs and country. When I first started it was more geared towards rock but you need to adapt to the times.

How long have you been using Music Teacher’s Helper?
About 10 years.

What is your favorite thing about Music Teacher’s Helper?
It helps me keep track of my students lessons which is a crucial thing if you are self employed.

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Posted in Professional Development, Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management, Teaching Tips

composing holiday activity with music students

I didn’t warn my students they’d be composing. I was pretty sure they’d feel intimidated, so I simply asked them for favorite holiday phrases. When they asked why, I said, “You’ll see.” And once they heard the glimmer of a secret, they were hooked.

Here’s what we did.

STEP 1

“Think of one or two short holiday phrases .” (Three or four phrases for older students.)

“What’s a holiday phrase?”

“A word or group of words you hear around Christmastime. It could even be words to a song.”

Some might want an example, such as “Merry Christmas!” Or show them this.  I heard “Ho, ho, ho!” “Open up the presents.” “Happy Birthday, Jesus!” In addition, one came up with “Hark! How the jingle bells rock!” Another said, “Elf on the shelf.”

This exercise provided both rhythm and lyrics for the composing activity. But it only took about five minutes.

STEP 2

We listed the phrases and spoke them in rhythm one after the other. We switched the order until they liked the flow. Then I had them tap and clap the rhythms. If they gave too long a phrase, I said “We need it shorter.” Or if the first phrase was in three but the next in four, “Try another.”

This took five minutes or under.

STEP 3

The melody of their composing came next.

Read more…

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Posted in Composing & Arranging, Promoting Your Studio

Andrew

Member Spotlight – Ashli

September 30th, 2016 by

Falcon, CO music lessons

Welcome back to our member spotlight series. Today we have Ashi. She teaches piano and voice lessons in Falcon, CO.

How long you’ve been teaching?
23 years.

How would you describe your studio space to someone that’s never visited?
It’s a wonderful place where learning and creativity combine to support aspiring musicians of all ages! Also, we play on a Yamaha baby grand and a Roland HP550 G, so we have the benefit of both digital and traditional instruments.
Read more…

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Posted in Professional Development, Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management, Teaching Tips

This past month I gave a piano masterclass in Jakarta, Indonesia. How? Read below – this post will hopefully inspire you with ideas to help your students (and bring more students to you).

Back in May, I had a dilemma that many teachers face: our piano students leave town for the summer. I could teach my remaining students until the fall rolled around, but what if I mixed in a little adventure?

I brushed with the travel bug last year, but I had never been to Asia. I started thinking, how cool would it be to visit and teach music somewhere out there?

It never hurts to check. I was enticed by Bali, so I chose to look into the city of Jakarta, a short plane ride away.

Steps to Teach Music Overseas

  1. Created a spreadsheet and Googled Indonesian music schools.
  2. Made a list of ~20, with links and contact info.
  3. Crafted a short email, stating that I wanted to teach a masterclass and/or teach lessons while I was visiting.
  4. Cut down my already short email by half, to be clearer and to-the-point.
  5. Sent this to each school.

Within the week, two had enthusiastically responded. I chose to work with Rosa Mistyca, the super sharp and talented owner of Ensiklomusika, based in Jakarta. We Skyped once to confirm that, yes, we’re both real people. Rosa agreed to promote my visit to Jakarta residents (a ton of work on her part). The deal was – I’d give one presentation for teachers looking for tips on teaching, and one masterclass where I teach individual students for ~25 minutes each, with their families and other students in the audience. Over the next month, we coordinated dates and suddenly I realized: Oh this is really happening. Can’t back out now.

No Longer Just a Fantasy: I’m Really Going to Asia

I booked my ticket, got my shots, and started to prepare. I had never done any of this before. But after a decade of teaching and making music in NYC, I felt ready to share what I’ve learned, to challenge myself, and to embrace a little chaos and uncertainty.

I sat down, nervously started to write…and realized I knew a lot more than I thought.

Until you write down or present what you know in a codified way, it’s tough to know how much you truly know. This is why blogging and writing lesson notes to families are so crucial (Music Teacher’ s Helper lets you do this easily, by the way). It doesn’t just help them but gives your teaching clarity. Weak habits get broken. You start to see how to approach the problems students face but also why, at a deeper level, an approach is good or needs to change. Very powerful.

Still, I was intimidated. Ensiklomusika was counting on me, paying me, to prepare something clear and useful, in an unfamiliar context, in a foreign country. It would be nice if they all loved it, and loved me, but maybe they’ll think I’m a fraud. Then what?

A wise man once wrote: “the future is indeed terrifyingly unknowable when you can’t even focus on the present.”

So I focused on what I could control: my own effort, in that moment.

Weeks later, I arrived in Jakarta and spent some time wandering around the city.

After a few stimulating days dodging Southeast Asia traffic, I hunkered down in my hotel to work on my presentation.

The Presentation

I arrived, sat down at the piano, and relaxed for a few minutes. Oh wait, I know how to do this.

Soon, a dozen teachers from Jakarta filed in, with pens and paper, and sat down, waiting for me to begin.

So I took a deep breath, and began. I talked about rhythmic approaches, how to sight-read, and common problems students have. I shared stories about my students to show why rapport matters so much – students often stay or leave because of this alone.

Finally, I brought in a unique approach to helping kids, as young as four, read and play music from their first lesson. I’ve used Andrew Ingkavet’s Musicolor Method for close to a year and watched as referrals flew in, my roster almost double, and my confidence as a teacher grow like crazy. Andrew’s approach not only works, but kids (and even one of my adult students!) really love it. What an opportunity to show a room full of Jakarta residents something new, from the other side of the world!

masterclass-group-1-high-res

After two hours, the conference ended. The masterclass began soon after.

Again, this was new for me. I was to give each of seven students a private lesson…with their families, friends, and students watching. To take the searing spotlight off the student, I planned to address the audience at times, to include them in the learning process.

This means I had to:

  • immediately identify the problems that particular student (a student I had just met!) was facing
  • help her feel comfortable enough to listen to me and try my suggestions (with a watching audience)
  • throughout each lesson, I had to observe, frame, and simplify those problems to the audience in a way that 1) didn’t alienate the student herself, and 2) helped the audience understand some technicals without alienating them

masterclass-student-6-CROP-high-res

By the end, I was totally wiped out.

And who headlines the entire masterclass? A wildly talented student, Elnino, six years old, sits down and crushes a tricky Sonatina. This boy used every part of his body gracefully and played it passionately. Not like a robot at all. It was easy for him.

Elnino’s physical instincts were top-notch. I nudged the audience to observe what he does so effortlessly with his arms and body overall, to open their minds to how he’s intuitively solved his own physical problems, the same problems that plague other students.

What a reward, to present material that I love to new faces, and they were thrilled!

We finished, grabbed a beer, and Rosa forced me to eat a durian (a fruit that smells so bad it offends cockroaches). Then I hopped on a plane to Bali the next morning. What a trip.

durian-rosa-high-res

Takeaways: What I Learned by Teaching Teachers and Giving a Piano Masterclass

It challenged me to condense all my knowledge in a simple, actionable way, and to do this publicly, on the spot.

I learned to repeat myself, helpfully. For instance, unclear rhythms cause most problems for students. During the masterclass, I saw five students struggle with this. So I approached them with a similar solution, five times, and noted the common thread to the student and the audience. Everyone wins.

The experience gave me more confidence as a teacher. It gave my work visibility, legitimacy, and a bridge to a whole new set of relationships on a different continent. As a busy teacher in NYC, I know that relationships, and ultimately businesses, are built and sustained on trust. I managed to create a pocket of that within an entirely new part of the world.

____

Want to try something like this? You never know, all it takes is a quick email. Plan ahead now before next summer comes – Ensiklomusika continuously accepts foreign teachers during their visits.

brett-recital-high-res

Brett Crudgington runs a private piano studio in Brooklyn, NY for over 20 students. He studied jazz as a teenager and spent formative years in college working with John Kamitsuka on classical music. It was here that he learned Abby Whiteside’s physical approach to the piano, how to make music that emanates from the core rather than the fingers. He actively brings a wide range of pedagogical tools to his lessons, including Andrew Ingkavet’s Musicolor Method.

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Posted in Professional Development, Promoting Your Studio

music teaching tips

Welcome to our member spotlight series. Today we have Angie & Marcus. The questions are answered by Angie, but the husband and wife duo teach music lessons together in Boise, Idaho.

How long you’ve been teaching?

15 years

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Posted in Professional Development, Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management, Teaching Tips

music teacher technology

Written by Nick Cesare

What do you do when you’re looking for a service of some kind? I know that I almost always do one thing: Google it. I was looking for a Greek restaurant in my area last week and the first thing that I did was go to Google and type in “Greek food near me.” The second thing I did was check out what people were saying about the options on social media. Finally, I chose the place that was the best mix of local and highly rated and went there for lunch.

We do it so readily for food (and pretty much anything else), so it makes sense that when parents or adult students are looking for a music teacher in their area the first place they go to is the internet. Putting up flyers isn’t good enough to attract students anymore. The music teacher of the 21st century needs to have a strong online presence. Whether you’ve been teaching for 30 years or you’re on your way to becoming a music teacher, here’s how you need to be getting online.

Get on Social Media

There’s a lot of social media out there and it’s tough to know what’s important to have and what’s just fluff. In my opinion you’ve definitely got to have these things.

  • Facebook. Create a page for your studio, not necessarily for yourself. Here’s where you can keep students updated on musical happenings in your area and post about your own upcoming performances.
  • Next you’ll need a Twitter page. Follow and tweet at other music organizations in your area. This will help you gain visibility and followers. Whenever you tweet anything make sure that you append the now famous # to it. For example, #viola will get my tweets to show up whenever somebody searches for it. Great hashtags are relevant and roll off the tongue easily, like #MusicalMonday.
  • Another great tip is to retweet tweets that you like from bigger organizations (e.g. the NY Philharmonic) with lots of followers. People who read their page will be able to see that you’ve retweeted the content and that will lead them to you.
  • Finally, you’ll absolutely want to get yourself on Linkedin. It’s the goto resource for professionals these days and helps you to come off as a skilled musician.

This may all seem daunting, but it’s not as bad as it seems. If, like me, you’re not a natural social media butterfly, brush up on these social media tips and make sure that you link all of your social media accounts together, so that people who visit your Twitter are led to your Linkedin and Facebook pages and vice versa. This will give potential students and their parents an impression of you as an active professional who they feel familiar with.

Get Your Own Website

Thankfully the days when the web was dominated by opaque acronyms like HTML, CSS, and XML are long gone. It is definitely both possible and affordable to create your own website with either free or, at worst, inexpensive tools. Here’s a great guide to creating your own website to get you started.

Some awesome things that you can do with a website:

  • Make a newsletter to keep parents updated on student progress, recitals, and happenings in the world of your instrument. This helps parents feel engaged with their child’s progress, making them more likely to stick around. This is a great time to get your studio recital trailer out there.
  • Blog about music and your instrument. To current and prospective students alike this paints you as a well-rounded professional who knows their stuff. If you write good original content make sure that you share it on your social media accounts and encourage readers to do the same. With a little luck you can become internet famous, which is huge for getting your name out there.
  • Talk about students – anonymously. This is definitely not the place to vent about how Timmy forgot his music again or how Sally didn’t practice. Stay positive and anonymous with things like “everybody played great at the solo competition this weekend!” Or “it was great to see everyone at the Symphony concert tonight!”

Final Thoughts

One thing that I haven’t covered is online teaching. This is really a beast of its own that deserves more attention than I can give it here. I will say this, however: the tips that I’ve given are equally important in building both a local and digital community around your studio. The only difference might be in what/who you tweet about; whether you tweet about local or national music organizations and events.

Go ahead and make this article your first tweet! And good luck out there! Tweet at me with any questions or comments @cesare_nick.

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Posted in Promoting Your Studio

imageThe school year is coming to an end, and it is once again time to host my annual studio recital. I used to organize two studio recitals every year, once in December (called Holiday Recital) and once in June (Summer Recital). The Holiday recital became more and more difficult to schedule around everyone’s holiday plans, and now with a new baby, I decided to just do one big recital in June to celebrate the students’ achievements throughout the year. I now call it Annual Studio Recital and Awards Ceremony.

We all know how much time and effort can go into organizing these studio recitals, from renting the venue, scheduling students, to making programs, preparing refreshments, ordering awards…the list goes on and on. Ever since my first studio recital many years ago, I came up with the idea of making postcard invitations to give to the students so they can invite friends and family to come. This has proved to be an excellent investment for my time and effort, as the students hand these out at school to their classmates, and I have gotten new students as a result 🙂

This year, I am doing something extra to further promote my studio recital. I made a movie trailer!

Here is how I did it:

1. I use my iPad.

2. Open iMovie app (free download at Apple Store).

3. Click on the “+” sign to create new project.

4. Select “Trailer”.

5. Choose a theme (I chose Coming of Age).

6. Click “Create” (top right hand corner).

7. Fill out the form under “Outline” (This is the movie credits page).

8. Click on “Storyboard” (next to Outline).

9. Choose pictures/videos stored on your iPad and insert in each box. You can customize the wording to go with the pictures.

10. Done! You can save your new movie trailer on your iPad, email to students, and upload to Facebook and YouTube!

Hope everyone’s studio recital goes well!

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Posted in Product Reviews, Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management