Financial Business

Every professional or aspiring professional music teacher needs a well crafted bio. Your personal bio is your way of introducing yourself to new students, fans, and music industry types in a way that puts your best foot forward.  Here are some very important concepts to keep in mind as you craft your own bio.

Target Your Audience

Before you begin your bio make sure you have a clear idea of who your main audience will be. What details will the people who are interested in your talent and music instruction want to know about you? This should frame how you go about writing your personal bio statement. Always keep this in mind as you write.  Who is my target market?  As an example: If I were a music teacher trying to market my lessons toward aspiring singer/songwriters I’d make sure that I mentioned my extensive knowledge of Beatles tunes, James Taylor songs, or John Mayer songs etc.  In addition, I’d  also mention whether I’d played on any albums released or performed in any local venues….

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AN ONGOING CONCERN for many independent music teachers is the change of commitment level of students during the summer months. While some teachers enjoy the usually lightened studio schedule during the summer months, most of us depend on our teaching as our livelihood and have bills that do not go away during this time. I would love to hear your ideas, especially those of you that have been successful at insuring yourselves regular employment year long!

ESTABLISHING A SUMMER REQUIREMENT (a minimum number of lessons, with the option of replacing some private lessons with one of the various summer workshops), has been most helpful for me in keeping things going in my studio.  Though I  cannot really make anyone take classes, the ones that do are assured their slot, or first choice of times in my schedule when the school year comes back around.  My students and parents seem to really enjoy the flexibility with having a couple of options for summer lessons and a variety of supplemental classes.   [···]

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I am a teacher who does not usually struggle with fixing a vocal problem or finessing a vocal line, but does struggle with keeping herself organized! I have three assistants at this time who help me overcome this deficiency. One manages my scheduling, a second manages my billing, and the third manages and arranges my student’s and vocal group’s performances. The latter two work just a few hours a month. The former oversees any lesson changes I need to make to accommodate my directing and performing or changes that may be requested by my students and their families, and she usually works 10 hours or so a month. [···]

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