Performing

Posts about performing music, recitals, concerts. Topics could cover stage fright, how to have a good recital, etc.

Imagine a musical review inspired by the original Mouseketeers and wrapped in the imagination of Walt Disney. It will both entertain and educate.

This is the third in a series of magical music recital ideas from my sister Vicky Dresser. I’ve included costume, program, décor and treat suggestions, plus a chronological list of some Disney movies and songs. And…Donald Duck might make a surprise appearance!

Tweak this Musical Review for Your Situation

  1. Content: You get to choose which Disney movies and songs to include. Will you go back to Disney’s first movie, Snow White, or only as far as the year your oldest student was born?
  2. Program: On the cover, a student’s rendering of the 1930s Mickey Mouse. Or perhaps the Mickey silhouette. Inside, create small mouse ears in front of each song. Three lower case letter o’s, the two outer ones superscript—like footnotes.

ooo Someday My Prince Will Come…………………………Student Name

  1. Costumes: Optional. They can be as simple as a T-shirt with students’ names or perhaps the Mickey silhouette, or as elaborate as costumes from the various movies represented.

The Mickey Mouse Club Musical Review—Sample Program

Your smiling Mouseketeers have greeted their guests, handed out programs and helped folks get seated. It’s time to begin. Gather your students up front for a group photo-op.

When students hear the “Mickey Mouse March” by Jimmy Dodd, have them split and march around the side aisles and back up the center. The music could be a recording or one or more students playing/singing. You might have an authentic Mouseketeer Roll Call with all students’ introductions—this can be their one bow of the day, after which they take their seats in the front rows.

Here is a chronological list of some Disney movies with quite a few song possibilities:

1937 Snow White [···]

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Folk songs used to top the lists of school music classes. Now it’s rare to find a student who has even heard many of our country’s folk songs. Why not celebrate them in a recital?

This is my second article in a series of ideas from my sister Vicky Dresser, maker of magical music recitals.  And as I’ve shared hers, I’ve gotten a few of my own. You’ll probably think up even more as you read. I invite you to share them with MTH readers in the comments below.

Organize Songs by Type or Genre:

  • Old colonial Times
  • River songs and Sea Chanteys
  • Spirituals
  • Wartime songs
  • Novelty songs
  • Camp songs
  • Old time religion
  • Mountain music
  • The old west
  • Patriotic songs
  • Good old folk tunes (plain and fancy)
  • Hi-brow
  • Modern folk
  • Mining songs from the gold rush

This type of recital practically begs for variety. [···]

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The six practice strategies listed below come directly from the cognitive psychological scientists at LearningScientists.org. Megan Smith and Yana Weinstein hold doctorate degrees and have systematically applied current research on the brain and how it learns to the classroom setting.

I’ve taken their learning strategies one step further and applied them specifically to practicing an instrument. A good portion of the following paragraphs closely resemble their findings and I greatly appreciate their inspiration for this post!

The main point of their research is how the brain remembers best. It’s not through repetition nearly as much as through retrieval of information.

“Every time you leave a little space, you forget a bit of the information, and then you kind of relearn it. That forgetting actually helps you to strengthen the memory. It’s kind of counterintuitive, but you need to forget a little bit in order to then help yourself learn it by remembering again.”

-Weinstein from TheCultofPedagogy.com

You may find the list below validating like it was for me. I’ve encouraged most of these tactics for years and am thrilled that they are now scientifically proven to work thanks to Dr. Smith and Dr. Weinstein! Perhaps you’ll feel the same? Each strategy is first defined in the clinical terms found at TheLearningScientists.org. Next, you’ll read how I relate them to practice. I’ve also connected visuals to each strategy to help practicers understand and recall each one. [···]

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