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How to be Heard as a Modern Music Teacher

music teacher technology

Written by Nick Cesare

What do you do when you’re looking for a service of some kind? I know that I almost always do one thing: Google it. I was looking for a Greek restaurant in my area last week and the first thing that I did was go to Google and type in “Greek food near me.” The second thing I did was check out what people were saying about the options on social media. Finally, I chose the place that was the best mix of local and highly rated and went there for lunch.

We do it so readily for food (and pretty much anything else), so it makes sense that when parents or adult students are looking for a music teacher in their area the first place they go to is the internet. Putting up flyers isn’t good enough to attract students anymore. The music teacher of the 21st century needs to have a strong online presence. Whether you’ve been teaching for 30 years or you’re on your way to becoming a music teacher, here’s how you need to be getting online.

Get on Social Media

There’s a lot of social media out there and it’s tough to know what’s important to have and what’s just fluff. In my opinion you’ve definitely got to have these things.

  • Facebook. Create a page for your studio, not necessarily for yourself. Here’s where you can keep students updated on musical happenings in your area and post about your own upcoming performances.
  • Next you’ll need a Twitter page. Follow and tweet at other music organizations in your area. This will help you gain visibility and followers. Whenever you tweet anything make sure that you append the now famous # to it. For example, #viola will get my tweets to show up whenever somebody searches for it. Great hashtags are relevant and roll off the tongue easily, like #MusicalMonday.
  • Another great tip is to retweet tweets that you like from bigger organizations (e.g. the NY Philharmonic) with lots of followers. People who read their page will be able to see that you’ve retweeted the content and that will lead them to you.
  • Finally, you’ll absolutely want to get yourself on Linkedin. It’s the goto resource for professionals these days and helps you to come off as a skilled musician.

This may all seem daunting, but it’s not as bad as it seems. If, like me, you’re not a natural social media butterfly, brush up on these social media tips and make sure that you link all of your social media accounts together, so that people who visit your Twitter are led to your Linkedin and Facebook pages and vice versa. This will give potential students and their parents an impression of you as an active professional who they feel familiar with.

Get Your Own Website

Thankfully the days when the web was dominated by opaque acronyms like HTML, CSS, and XML are long gone. It is definitely both possible and affordable to create your own website with either free or, at worst, inexpensive tools. Here’s a great guide to creating your own website to get you started.

Some awesome things that you can do with a website:

  • Make a newsletter to keep parents updated on student progress, recitals, and happenings in the world of your instrument. This helps parents feel engaged with their child’s progress, making them more likely to stick around. This is a great time to get your studio recital trailer out there.
  • Blog about music and your instrument. To current and prospective students alike this paints you as a well-rounded professional who knows their stuff. If you write good original content make sure that you share it on your social media accounts and encourage readers to do the same. With a little luck you can become internet famous, which is huge for getting your name out there.
  • Talk about students – anonymously. This is definitely not the place to vent about how Timmy forgot his music again or how Sally didn’t practice. Stay positive and anonymous with things like “everybody played great at the solo competition this weekend!” Or “it was great to see everyone at the Symphony concert tonight!”

Final Thoughts

One thing that I haven’t covered is online teaching. This is really a beast of its own that deserves more attention than I can give it here. I will say this, however: the tips that I’ve given are equally important in building both a local and digital community around your studio. The only difference might be in what/who you tweet about; whether you tweet about local or national music organizations and events.

Go ahead and make this article your first tweet! And good luck out there! Tweet at me with any questions or comments @cesare_nick.

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1 Comment

  1. djsergiocabrera

    HI there,
    Thank you very much for your info on how to be heard as modern music teacher, a very eye opener.
    Now I still believe in the word of mouth and I would like to ask whether this would be necessary, I mean to print out some info sheets that I can put up on some boards, but my question is, as I am ver new to ad myself, where to start putting this info sheets up?
    Thank you very much for your time.

    All the best
    Sergio