Music Teacher's Helper Blog

music student stage freight

Do teachers contribute to stagefright? Can we help students avoid it?

Stagefright seems to happen when performers focus too much on themselves–what people think, whether they’ll get through a tricky spot, whether some unforeseen problem will throw them off, whether they’re deserving of being out on stage.

It seems to me that when the focus is on the music, rather than the performer–when a performer has something musical he or she really wants to say–there’s much less of a chance for stagefright to take hold.

Some teachers are anxious to impress upon students the gravity of their practicing and performing responsibilities. They sometimes use lessons to put students through the ringer, essentially making students feel chronically underpracticed, underprepared, and liable to make a mistake at any moment. Performance can be portrayed as extremely serious, requiring the proper dress, the proper entrance, the proper demeanor.

Few students could get through lessons like that without feeling fearful of performing. For some, that fear becomes stagefright; for others, with courage and determination, it doesn’t.

But what happens when a teacher helps a student become invested in the musicality of a piece, the feeling behind it, the composer’s intent, and even the background of how and why it was written and used? Then the student can offer listeners something more meaningful than whether a certain passage was rendered perfectly.

Those who strive for technical perfection only to impress people or win them over are focused on themselves. Mistakes can be painful and humiliating for them, as if their fingers betrayed them.

A student personally involved in the musicality of a piece, rather than its virtuosity, is probably better equipped to put mistakes in perspective, and not be afraid of them in performance. This student may be more motivated to work on technique in order to make a piece music effective and compelling, rather than to make the performance perfect.

It’s fun to encourage students at all levels to experiment with musical phrasing. They can discover why the composer or editor wrote in certain dynamic markings–or perhaps find a new but convincing musical presentation. They can create a storyline and think of their music as its soundtrack.

We can also help students put mistakes in perspective. One basic way is to appreciate a student for getting what we are asking for, even if something else didn’t work. It’s great to be able to focus on a problem and solve it; it’s a bit daunting to focus on one problem but still get yelled at if you didn’t also happen to solve all the other problems at the same time!

Maybe in a future blog I’ll list some ways I like to help students explore musicality, and keep their mistakes in perspective. If you have some ideas you’d like to share, I’m sure we’d all like to read your comments!

Fear isn’t a very healthy motivator, nor does it have much connection to making music. I suspect that stagefright is one proof of this, and we teachers can do something about it.

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Most music teachers at some time or another will have a need to “write” music of some kind – whether an original composition of any length, or some simple exercises to give to students. When that time comes, you can either do it by hand, or use notation software on the computer.

If you choose to notate your music on the computer, you have a few advantages:

  • Readability – it looks like professionally published music when printed
  • Accuracy – it can play back your music for you so you can listen to make sure it sounds right. You also don’t have to worry about erasers or white-out when you need to change a note.
  • Speed – you can hook up a MIDI keyboard and actually “play” your music onto the screen

If you haven’t taken advantage of music notation software before, you might want to give it a try. Good music notation packages can be quite expensive (several hundred dollars). However, Coda Music has a simplified version of their Finale suite called “Finale Notepad”, and it is completely free! While the full version has a lot more features, Finale Notepad has been feature-rich enough for all my music notation needs. And they have versions for both Windows and Mac.

You can download Finale Notepad for free at:

http://www.finalemusic.com/notepad/

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I recently received an email from a paying subscriber:

“I have used this website for 2 months, and I don’t know how I lived without it before!! it’s great! Thank you. Starting about a week ago, I’m getting all the time a window that says: ‘Security information: this page contains both secure and nonsecure items, would you like to display the nonsecure items?’ How do I get rid of it?”

Since we added SSL Data Encryption for paying plans, some teachers have noticed a warning when they login saying that there are secure and non-secure items on the page. This is a warning that Internet Explorer gives if not all the references to files on the page are https. Unfortunately (and incorrectly), it also gives the error if any of the links are pointing to about:blank, or null – which is still secure. Other browsers (such as Mozilla Firefox) do not warn about this since it is not a security issue.

But to get around this IE bug we changed a few links. It turns out the culprits were the bar chart on the home page, and the question mark help icons (when you hover over them).

Paying subscribers using Internet Explorer should no longer get warning about this unsecure items on a page. Thank you to those who pointed this out to me!

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