Breathing

Just like any instrument, a singer needs to take care of the voice, this includes good and efficient vocal warm-ups.

When it comes to music education, most teachers will make use of their students’ voice, so singing is an important part of learning music, even if being a professional singer is not your students’ main focus.

Of course, if you are teaching how to sing, you have to take your time with warm ups, not just so they can imitate the teacher and do it well in class, but help them learn to make it part of their routine.

Why Warm-Ups Are Important

Most students just assume that everything the teacher says is ok, but there are some things that should be justified, not because they are that cuestionable but because a singer should know what every warm up is for.

There are several ways to do vocal warm ups, each for a different function, for example, some improve your breathing, help you relax and others improve your range.

Explaining what every warm up is to your students will improve the exercise and make them take it more seriously.

Monitor Warm-Ups

A teacher should be very present during these warm ups, so that he can correct them and make sure that they will do it the right way when nobody’s watching.

Many students can get very dependent on their vocal coaches and teachers when it comes to warming up their voice, and this is not ideal at all, mostly because singers also have to warm up their voice hours or even days before a performance.

Breathing

This is maybe one of the most important and most overlooked aspects of singing for beginners but it should be made very clear that it can do a lot of damage to your voice if not done properly.

It is very clear that there is a specific way your students should learn how to breath instead of just breathing as they would normally.

You can show them the importance of breathing by telling them to sing while breathing normally and then try again after teaching them how to breath with their diaphragm.

The difference will be very obvious, and of course they will want to do it after that, but as a teacher you have to check once in a while that your students are breathing properly in order to avoid

Cooling Down After Singing

This may seem strange but it’s actually very important and recommended to cool down your voice in order to avoid vocal fatigue.

However, it’s also something that it’s very easy to forget for your students, first because it’s not a common thing you hear, second because all you want to do when you stop singing is to rest and that’s it, but if you take 15 minutes to do some exercises to cool down your voice, resting will be more effective.

According to Francisca M. these are some of the best exercises to do to cool down your voice after singing.

  • The Siren Wail – move from your highest (comfortable) note on an “ahh sound,” sliding down to the octave below
  • Chords – move from your highest note down 5 steps
  • Bubble Trill – Similar to your vocal warm-up exercises, incorporate lip trills into your cool-down

Warm-ups

The most important thing to have in mind as a singing teacher when it comes to breathing and vocal warm-ups is to be constantly on the lookout for lack of warm-ups, bad breathing techniques or anything that can put strain on the voice and eventually contributing to not learning how to sing properly.

Remember, your students can only reach their full potential if they take care of their voice.

Did you know it’s easy to add vocal exercises as an assignment in your students’ lesson notes within Music Teacher’s Helper software? MTH likes to make things easy for you and your student to remember what was assigned each week and lesson notes are a great feature for this!

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Want to help you students to see how the respiratory system works? Check out the American Lung Associations website. It has a fun interactive teaching tool that will describe how each part of the respiratory system works and show it in action.

This is a great teaching tool for students of all ages because the simple, colorful cartoon illustration is accurate without being too graphic and detailed. It high-lights each selected part of the system and gives a simple description of the role that each part plays in breathing. Once you (or a student) has clicked through each part of the respiratory track, you can view a demonstration of all of the pieces in action. The illustration even has blue air on the inhale and red air on the exhale. There is a self executing file that you can download as well to use when you don’t have access to the internet. (Unfortunately, it is a Windows application and I run a Macintosh computer, so I wasn’t able to test this feature.) You can also view the website in a printer friendly form (if you want to create a hand out for students.) and email it (if you would like to send it to students.)

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