lesson

I have been using Music Teachers Helper to support my music teaching business since 2008.  Its  exciting to see the changes over the years which add to it’s effectiveness as my office support.

During this season of Thanksgiving, I want to thank MTH for being innovative in listening to the needs of its customers and for  providing us with what we need to make our job easier. What music teacher wants to spend time on scheduling and bookkeeping when we could be searching for music and creating an exciting environment for our students?

This is the first article in a series of how I use MTH creatively, in ways perhaps not intended by the software itself. If you look back on my previous blogs you will see that is my forte (no pun intended).

MTH calendar showing NO LESSON days

MTH calendar showing NO LESSON days

Customer questions about schedule around the holidays

As easily accessible as is the MHT calendar, I get numerous emails from students asking about the days no lesson will be held as we approach holidays. These questions come despite the web calendar and email reminders about days lessons will not be held. [···]

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Student blooms musically

Student blooms musically

Best compliment I ever received (from a fellow musician) following a student recital:

“Your students made music—they didn’t just play notes, they played musically.”

I tucked it away in my heart, and I pull it out every so often. This is my highest goal for students. I have lots of goals for them, but none compare. I want students of piano to have a fine, rounded hand shape and non-collapsing knuckles—but it would be pointless if the music didn’t come from inside them at some point. I want them to practice till they are note-perfect—but I’d rather hear a few klinkers in a piece played with the whole heart than a flawless robot-like rendition.

But how do we get them from playing or singing halting, stilted notes—or even perfect notes—to making musical magic? Can it be taught, or only caught? Or must it simply grow to maturity?

Guitar PlanterMy present thought is that I can teach all the components that go into a beautifully musical performance, but something has to happen deep inside the student. It’s like a seed. I must amend its soil, cultivate it, fertilize it, remove weeds, water it, warm it, show it the sun… but I cannot force it to grow and bloom. The things I provide all go in, but what comes out is beyond my control.                                                                 

Before music happens, students must hear the real deal. Heart-felt performances by other musicians (try youtube, or better yet, encourage your students to attend concerts—oh, and don’t forget to demonstrate it yourself!). They must hear about the real deal, too. Awareness helps. I tell about and show them the details that go into it. If there are lyrics, we talk about how we’d say or sing them. The high points and low points, any surprises. We talk about how music makes us feel, and why. I tell them they have the capacity to move their audience, to entertain them. Or maybe they are their own audience—can they play so movingly that it affects their own emotions? Do they throw themselves into it?

I love it when the student reaches the point where I can say, “Excellent. You have the notes down perfectly. Now let’s make music!”

What do you think? Can making music be taught, caught, or must it be grown? How do you get your students to blossom–to do more than simply play notes on a page?

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Pie Chart

I remember when I first started teaching, being anxious about how I would manage to fill a 30 minute lesson! Now, twenty years on, I wonder sometimes how I can possibly fit everything into an hour’s session!!! I’m sure you’d agree, as you develop as a teacher, it becomes increasingly hard to manage lesson time. If I’m honest, at times I’ve wasted too much time on an activity in a lesson to the detriment of other equally important things. So earlier this year I took a long hard look at time management in my lessons with a view to regaining control!

How to manage time?!?

What a question! Someone once said to me: [···]

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