music

Hi, Everyone. We hope your February has been going great! We recently added a feature that will save you from having to log in each session. If you select the checkbox, you can automatically access your account when entering that Tab’s URL. For instance, if you bookmark the Calendar Page URL, https://www.musicteachershelper.com/teacher/calendar.php, you will not be required to log in to go directly to that page.

Bypassing the login will last for two weeks before needing to re-check the box.  It’s device specific so you will need to select the checkbox on all devices you want to stay logged in. And make sure not to use this feature on devices you share with others that you don’t want to have access to your account.

Here are a few fixes made this week in the new version:

  • The list of names that come up for “Use Subscription For Payment” was showing the entire list of student names and not just the ones who have entered their credit card info to be auto billed.
  • The secondary billing contact was not showing on the generated invoice for some teachers.
  • Charges in transaction logs of each student were missing momentarily in the new version but have since been restored.
  • Some event reminders were sent out a day earlier than scheduled in the new version and have since been corrected.
  • If you received a PayPal integration error message related to an integration update, that has been resolved by the programming team and everything now works smoothly between your account and Paypal.
  • If you were having issues changing the default time format in Settings, specifically when clicking from am to pm, this has been corrected.
  • For some teachers, the Transaction Log was not showing changes but the invoice was.
  • When some teachers were creating available times on their calendar, students were not able to click available time slots to sign up for a lesson. If any of your students were experiencing this, they can now sign up for time slots you make available.

Did you know that you can choose multiple instruments in the settings page?

If you teach multiple instruments, select all that apply so you can assign which instrument(s) your students are taking lessons with. Head over to Settings (top right drop down) and scroll to the bottom of the Studio Tab to select which instrument(s) you teach. Make sure to click Save Studio Settings when finished. Instrument icons will also show next to the students’ names and scheduled lessons as a reminder for you.

If you are experiencing any issues or have any questions for us, please reach out to support@musicteachershelper.com. Happy teaching!

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Other teachers said these things to me recently: “I’m just a small-town music teacher.” “It’s all been taught before.” “I don’t say anything new. It’s all been said before.” But not by you. You and your teaching are utterly unique.

Teachers with wonderfully creative ideas write online. Some of them compose songs we purchase for our students. Others create teaching strategies and games. Those aren’t your gifts? Don’t let that discourage you!

You leave a fingerprint on each student’s life…

Think about this. You leave a fingerprint on each student’s life. Utterly unique. Yes, many others have taught the same pieces. They’ve used the same materials. The same words will have been said. But not by you.

I recall the impact of various musicians on my own life. My mother left me a legacy to love music; to make music; to live and laugh music. My first private music teacher impressed me with her pretty voice. But I also picked up her touch on the piano, which I see passed on to my own students. A musician I met only once spoke two sentences that shaped my musical destiny. Other teachers plucked weeds, watered, fed and shone on me as I grew. A professor provided my first playing gig. Each of them impacted my life: utterly unique. Even a negative experience with a teacher helped shape me into a better person.

I’ve had students who no way in this world were going to sing or compose their own songs. But I nudged them. Now they’re making money at it.

Each student comes to you at a particular time of vulnerability. No one else will see him or her exactly the way you do. No one else will relate the way you do. The encouragement you speak at this time can change the course of a life. A word dropped by you might nourish words spoken by others. Your influence might inspire a student to drop a harmful thought pattern. You might provide an oasis. What if you’re the only one who really listens? You are undoubtedly providing a mode of expression that can last a lifetime.

So be encouraged, music teacher. Leave your utterly unique fingerprint on that life.

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fitness for musicians

By Robin Steinweg

It’s obvious. Physical fitness helps us be better vocalists, pianists, guitarists, whateverists. We grow more fit as we practice our instruments. This is probably especially true for voice or wind instruments. And it probably goes without saying. But teachers can also encourage students to great physical fitness during lessons.

Fitness by-products of playing or singing

  • Better posture
  • Breathing more deeply and breath control
  • Endurance/stamina
  • Better eating habits—especially stressed in vocal lessons, I suspect
  • Better hydration—I offer water to all students, not only vocalists
  • Greater body awareness
  • Emotional health

I recall one of my voice instructors telling me that if I were to sing correctly I’d probably never need to do crunches! It’s true that vigorous practice or performances can be taxing. But over time, they also build us up and energize us.

12 fun ways to encourage fitness during lessons or practice

(use some of these as practice challenges—get parents, siblings or grandparents to join in!)

  • Sit on an exercise ball during lessons or practice http://ow.ly/rRdc300JTeK
  • Stand to play, even at the piano
  • Walk around the room while playing or singing
  • March in place while playing
  • Practice vocal scales as you trot up and down the stairs
  • Dance the rhythm of your piece
  • If syncopated, add handclaps
  • Bounce a ball in rhythm while walking and playing (try it with a partner)
  • Jump on the rests
  • Listen to a recording of your piece—choreograph with steps and arm swings—like aerobic dance
  • If you have a trampoline, young students could practice bouncing in time to you or a recording
  • Set up a gentle obstacle course (chairs, cones, folders, stairs) and walk it while playing or singing

Note: check with parents before engaging students in activities (wouldn’t want to bring on an asthma attack or anything!).

How do you promote physical fitness as a music teacher?

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