pop music

Some Questions to Ponder

Have music lessons changed since you were a child?

Do you sense a shift in your teaching because of  iTunes, iPads, YouTube, Spotify…?

Have you modified your daily lessons to accommodate the interests of your students and their desire to play in today’s styles?

Do you intend to buck the cultural trend and stay true only to your “classically-trained” roots?

Do you carry a wait list because you offer lessons in the jazz/pop styles?

Regardless of your answers to the questions above, please take a moment to answer a few more in a brief survey.  Before you click on the link and take the survey, keep the following definitions in mind.

 

Clarifications of Styles

What does “Classically Trained” mean?

“Classical” instruction uses traditional method books that focus on reading from the grand staff, technique, and careful interpretation of the written page. Emphasis is on mastering and memorizing repertoire of the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and 20th century style periods. Theory is included but the overall approach includes little or no improvising.

What is  Jazz/Pop Training? (as defined by Bradley Sowash)

Dixieland, Big Band, Small Group in a club? All of these constitute jazz genres but jazz is not a style or sound. Jazz is an approach to making music that involves reading and improvising over specific rhythmic feels within a given  harmonic context. Born in America, the roots of jazz lie in:

composer, concert jazz pianist, author and educator

  • African Rhythms
  • European Harmonies
  • Ethnic Influences

For pianists, “pop” could be defined similarly since most pianists read. One big difference is that with jazz you are expected to personalize the music. That’s why people like to hear the same standards played by different artists: because every jazzer brings their own perspective to the interpretation.

Student bands playing music, however, usually try to sound exactly like the recording.  [···]

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With the retail hype surrounding the festive season starting earlier and earlier every year I am reluctant to write a post about Christmas in October, however this is the time of year that I start to prepare my students for the upcoming holiday season. I have just written to the parents of my students with some suggestions for sheet music orders.  [···]

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