teaching music

A designer’s goal is to make experiences simple, intuitive and accessible.  It’s all about creating an effective user experience.  What if we could redesign music education? [···]

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music teaching positive

We asked a few Music Teacher’s Helper members about something positive that happened in their studio this past year. Here are some answers below. Tell us yours in the comment section! 

“I started teaching students as young as five years old this year, and my studio grew. :)” – Brooke

“This year I am thankful that when one branch of my studio closed, a majority of my students from there traveled out of their way to continue to study with me at my home branch. I am grateful for their dedication and trust in my teaching. :)” – Lisa

“In 2016 I became much more professional. One of the things that helped the Alameda Cello Studio was Music Teacher’s Helper. It helped me to have an online presence that looks great, and also to get my student info organized and my calendar online.” – Marcie

“Finished the year with a great student piano recital! I appreciate the immediate, knowledge, and courteous help available through your live chat support.  Thanks!” – Angela

“I’ve had good recitals this year — and gained some wonderful new students, including a 25 year old autistic young man who I love working with.” – Karen

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Other teachers said these things to me recently: “I’m just a small-town music teacher.” “It’s all been taught before.” “I don’t say anything new. It’s all been said before.” But not by you. You and your teaching are utterly unique.

Teachers with wonderfully creative ideas write online. Some of them compose songs we purchase for our students. Others create teaching strategies and games. Those aren’t your gifts? Don’t let that discourage you!

You leave a fingerprint on each student’s life…

Think about this. You leave a fingerprint on each student’s life. Utterly unique. Yes, many others have taught the same pieces. They’ve used the same materials. The same words will have been said. But not by you.

I recall the impact of various musicians on my own life. My mother left me a legacy to love music; to make music; to live and laugh music. My first private music teacher impressed me with her pretty voice. But I also picked up her touch on the piano, which I see passed on to my own students. A musician I met only once spoke two sentences that shaped my musical destiny. Other teachers plucked weeds, watered, fed and shone on me as I grew. A professor provided my first playing gig. Each of them impacted my life: utterly unique. Even a negative experience with a teacher helped shape me into a better person.

I’ve had students who no way in this world were going to sing or compose their own songs. But I nudged them. Now they’re making money at it.

Each student comes to you at a particular time of vulnerability. No one else will see him or her exactly the way you do. No one else will relate the way you do. The encouragement you speak at this time can change the course of a life. A word dropped by you might nourish words spoken by others. Your influence might inspire a student to drop a harmful thought pattern. You might provide an oasis. What if you’re the only one who really listens? You are undoubtedly providing a mode of expression that can last a lifetime.

So be encouraged, music teacher. Leave your utterly unique fingerprint on that life.

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