teaching

Technology has been able to offer teachers tools and apps that make their work a lot easier or even explore new ways to teach.

Some of these tools come in the form of mobile apps, which offer a wide range of possibilities depending on what you are looking for.

There is an app for almost every problem so there are thousands of apps out there.he difficult part is to find which ones are really worth it.

First of all, note that there are great apps for music learning but the focus here is to see which ones could assist music teachers.

On that note, let’s have a look at the best 5 apps for music teachers that are available right now.

apps

Symphony Pro

This one is all about digital sheet music and it allows you to compose with up to 48 instruments.

It offers lead sheets, chords, charts, guitar tabs and so much more such as being able to make annotations and edit notes and bar properties.

forScore

forScore is a bit similar to Symphony Pro in the sense that it allows you to manage your sheet music but it focuses more on managing rather than composing.

You can drag and drop multiple files into the forScore library from Safari or the photos app. You can also import a PDF version of your score via iTunes, email, Google Drive, AirDrop, Dropbox or Bluetooth.

Piano Maestro

If you are looking to make your piano lessons a bit more fun and interactive for your younger students, Piano Maestro is one of the best options out there to do so.

If you are familiar with rhythm games and guitar hero then this will seem quite similar to that, however, its interface and overall presentation is all about bright colors and a clear focus towards learning how to actually play piano.

The way the app works is that it shows you the sheet music so that you play it, but in a way that it also feels like a game, encouraging students to beat high scores and get better at it.

It is definitely a very useful tool to get the hang of reading sheet music while playing piano.

It also features “Home Assignments” which you can use to assign specific songs to your students and make your lessons a lot more fun. 

The Metronome by Soundbrenner

Every music teacher needs to remind their students about keeping an organized mind when it comes to music, and what does that? Well, staying on tempo.

The way to practice this is of course is using a metronome.

You could buy a metronome but there is no doubt that the magic word here is convenience.

The fact that you can just download a metronome app and use it right there is very useful for every musician and it makes it all easier for teachers to show their students that it is indeed an easy tool to have.

However, which metronome is a good option to have?

The Metronome by Soundbrenner is a great choice. First of all, it’s available on android and iOS, secondly it’s free and every music student needs a metronome to learn music properly.

With this app you can go from simple 4/4 to more complex time signatures so your students can practice staying in tempo.

It also allows you to personalize your click sounds and save custom rhythms so you have no trouble finding them quickly.

Music Teacher’s Helper

Every music teacher needs some assistance on schedules, tasks, students and every little thing that comes with the job of education.

With Music Teacher’s Helper you can update student information, plan your schedule, prepare upcoming lessons and keep up to date with billing and invoices.

It’s also very easy to access your account from any of your devices so there won’t be any problems with accessibility.

This will allow you to have a lot more time on your hands to plan your lessons instead of using that precious time for tedious but necessary tasks.

If you want to try it out, you can start your free trial today!

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The evolution of technology has brought upon us an illusion that it has no bounds.The possibilities seem endless and our lives as musicians change with each new breakthrough, and it’s no different for the future of education.

Today, machine learning is starting to become that new breakthrough not just in music in general but in music education as well.

Machine learning is a process in which a computer learns over time and manages to create, modify and understand music composition.

This allows for quite a few applications in the area of music education as a way to enrich the traditional methods and teach in new creative ways.

2020

Last year was a big step towards discovering the potential of all these new tools and technologies that can be used for music education in the future.

More than just being a substitute for a normal class, this last year was about exploring new options and different ways to approach music education.

This brought many teachers closer to the idea of experimenting with apps, social networks, A.I. and even VR (Virtual Reality).

The Nature Of Music

Music is a very open ended discipline that involves a lot of influences and different contexts of learning. Which is why it would be a good idea to make the most out of the tools that we have in order to prepare students for the things that they will actually be more exposed to which is of course, outside the classroom and without a pen and paper.

Music Sharing and Social Network

The idea is to keep your students engaged in music and what better way to encourage music composition than using platforms such as SoundCloud, YouTube and even Google Classroom.

Sharing music with both classmates and teachers can be a great way to improve their skills as musicians while also making a bond with those that share the same interests.

A.I. and VR

While these are less explored areas in music education, there are some ways these tools can be used properly, and being on the lookout for any more breakthroughs is an important part of keeping the learning experience fresh and exciting.

DAWs (Digital Audio Workstation)

While we know these tools have been around for quite some time, music schools and teachers haven’t made the most of them.

In today’s world, music production is a big part of music in general, this means that performing is not everything.

All that comes after the actual playing is a whole world on its own that deserves attention not only because it matters to the music industry but because it can help your students learn more about how music works.

The Future of Music Teaching Tools

Future

According to William Bauer, UF online Master of Music in Music Education Program Director:

“Making technology available to teachers and students, and helping them understand its functionality, is necessary, but not sufficient. Technology is merely a tool, and a tool is not useful if one does not comprehend the various ways it can be employed to achieve a given outcome in a specific context. If music educators are to effectively integrate technology into teaching, learning and assessment, more is required than an understanding of specific technological tools. As a result, when exploring the use of technology with students, it’s critical that music teachers account for the curricular objectives being targeted, the benefits and limitations of the technology under consideration, the teaching and learning strategies to be used, and the context of a specific music class and school”.

Paul Shimmons

In an interview with StageRight Paul Shimmons shared some interesting experience on the use of technology as a music educator.

When grading students, Paul likes to use Seesaw or Class Dojo because they allow for multimedia presentation such as videos or recordings so that he can easily see and hear performances and refer to them for later reference. It’s also beneficial for students and parents because they can hear it, unlink with a traditional gradebook which can only show a simple number grade. It gives him the ability to share the progress of the student with parents so that they can be connected to the work their child is doing in the classroom every week.

By using this technology, students will also have a digital portfolio that they can refer to so they can see just how much they’ve improved and provide the positive feedback to encourage further development. This is tangible evidence that they’re learning.

The future of music education is as uncertain as the next technological breakthroughs, however as teachers, you need to be prepared by adapting to the most recent tools at your disposal., Iit can be surprising how much good it’ll do once you get to use them properly.

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When teaching, there is an obvious difference of students and teacher, and it defines the space in which each of them operates, this is, a predominance of speaker on the teacher’s side, and a predominance of listeners on the student’s side, but what to do when this dynamic changes, and what is the difference on it being caused by a good thing or a bad thing? Creativity.

Of course is a bad thing if you as teacher, see the class being interrupted by a student who is just looking for some fun to alleviate his boredom, but when a student interrupts because he wants to learn or share his opinion, that is a whole other subject.

Creative Student

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Student’s minds are a roller coaster of thoughts when truly invested into the class, this sometimes end in confusion, sometimes boredom, interest, fascination, and something else, which is the topic at hand, creativity.

Creativity can come easily to some people while listening to other things, as if they use what they listen as bridges to create new paths in their minds, and this can happen with children, teens and adults. To have a somewhat balanced opinion let’s pretend we are talking about a 17 year old boy or girl which we will call “the creative student”.

The creative student sometimes can be a bit impulsive, because of the amount of passion there is for music, this has to be tamed, not stopped.

The importance of giving creativity the attention it deserves cannot be dismissed. Concerning this fact, Peter Webster from the Thornton School of Music says:

Consider for a moment how this might affect motivation.  With the rich opportunities to create music comes an inherent desire to learn more about technique.  Practice time is not based only on a teacher-directed and teacher-centered set of technical challenges, devoid of any student engagement.  Instead, there is added a personal investment in improving one’s playing or singing.  Listening to one’s recorded performances focuses attention on the need to improve sound.  Students asked to analyze their own musical performances, perhaps their own music, become more intrinsically engaged.

That is the ultimate goal in music education, students have to be engaged and inspired to make their own music, that’s why letting their creativity fly in class is crucial to their formation as musicians.

Classroom instruction for younger grades can continue to be defined by singing and moving but must also include attention to composition, improvisation, and creative listening. We need to completely rethink methods class to include more composition and improvisation and greater attention to technology

The Focus on Creativity

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If this is the focus, learning about technique will become a necessary means to achieve what they as musicians want, in other words, it has to be the teacher’s priority to make every student feel as comfortable as they can in class.

It’s also important to remember that some students may be more outgoing and more open to share their tastes than others, which is the different between the creative student and the rest of them. When we refer to a “creative student” does not mean that the rest of them aren’t creative, it just means that them as students are not showing that side of them, and the desired thing should be to make them all creative students. No one should be feeling left out or less than the rest, and in online lessons, where there are no classmates in the traditional sense, creativity should be more easily involved in each lessons.

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