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5 Music Theory Tips DiagramPrelude – For this month’s blog, I thought I might share five notation tips that you probably won’t find in the average theory textbook but nonetheless are important rules in music writing. Just before we get started, it’s important for you to remember that in music notation, the standard measurement of distance is worked out in stave (staff) spaces. In the music publishing industry, stave (staff) heights can range anywhere from 9.2 millimetres for educational music to 3.7 millimetres for a full orchestral score. Generally, for normal instrumental parts, a size of between 6.5 and 7 millimetres is commonly used. (All 5 tips are illustrated in the diagram which you can click to enlarge).

  1. How long should a stem be? – Normally, the length of a note’s stem in music notation should be three and a half spaces. An easier way to work out stem length though, is that wherever the pitch position of the note-head on the stave (staff), the stem needs to go up or down an octave. When the note-head is positioned with two ledger (leger) lines or more, the stem always extends to the middle line of the stave (staff).
  2. Where should a clef be positioned? – The clef must always be indented to the right by one stave (staff) space. It’s vertical position must also be precise to render the intended pitches of the notes that follow.
  3. Which side of the note-head does the stem go on? – Here’s a killer tip to help students remember that  [···]
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Has a student ever had a difficult time mastering a piece?  Have you ever been at a loss as to how to organize a lesson and point students in a forward position toward successful goals accomplished in their practice times.  The following list is not exhaustive, but will hopefully be helpful to all of you as we strive to help our students develop a strong, well-rounded musical education.  This list is based only on the practice of one piece.  Theory, ear-training, sight-reading, application of duets, and much more are different subjects to be addressed at different times.  🙂 [···]

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